Driftwood Sunset – Uvita, Costa Rica

Driftwood Sunset

While down in Costa Rica after a day of exploring, Suzette and I went for a sunset beach walk to see if we might catch any late day light. As the sun was setting and we were running out of time I stumbled upon this interesting piece of driftwood with a giant hole through the center. Anytime you have forests meeting the ocean, beaches are bound to be littered with driftwood. What I love about this piece all of the dimension the driftwood contains. The ribs and valleys that really make you study the driftwood itself instead of just enjoying the color of the sunset.

Uvita Costa Rica is about 50 miles from the Panama border and is still sparsely inhabited compared to the northern more touristy areas. Known as a mecca for surfing, many of the beaches are crowded with American youth trying to escape the responsibility of adult life. The towns mainly consist of sea shack bars and restaurants, as well as hostel type hotels. The road to the south has been significantly improved and I would guess that this area won’t keep its 3rd world charm for long.

 

 

Sea Mists At Sunset – Navarro Beach CA

SeaMistsAtSunset

Navarro Beach is a small uninhabited park and beach where the Navarro River meets the Pacific. As the tides change, pools of water remain in the black sands and often the hulking remains of once giants of the forests become intricate driftwood. When I see this image I am reminded of the gentle roar of the surf, feel the mists on my skin, and smell the salty air. I love the intricate patterns of the driftwood root structure so much I made it a central feature of this image. Also, the distant clouds over the pacific make colorful sunsets a rare occurrence in Northern California Coastal afternoons.

 

Hope – Sea Cliffs of Mendocino CA

Hope

When exploring Mendocino, we came across many remote beaches and sea cliffs. I happened to be exploring this cave while the sun was setting and the scene struck me. The sun shining looked as it was illuminating a way out, a light at the end of the tunnel, the promise of a new day.

 

Guiding Light – Point Cabrillo Lighthouse In Fog – Mendocino California

Guiding Light

The Point Cabrillo lighthouse was first lit in 1909 in response to the treacherous sea passage that lumber shippers experienced in trying to fuel the building boom in San Francisco in the late 1800’s on. The light is visible from 13-15 miles and originally was powered by a Kerosene lamp which was replaced with an electric bulb in 1935. It is significant as it’s only one of 3 British built lenses in current operation in the US.

The story behind this photograph is that I was trespassing after hours to get this lit shot when the caretakers arrived. After a brief discussion/reprimand for being there after hours (and a donation to the lighthouse fund), not only was I permitted to keep working on my exposure but the caretaker offered to turn on all the lights inside the lighthouse to get the shot of the lighthouse fully illuminated in the fog and also provided suggestions for different angles to consider.

Port De Nuit

This image captures the essence of the harbor of Honfleur at night. While strolling through the city center you smell the seaside air, hear the Boats gently rocking in the placid harbor, and peer through the night to admire the dimly lit architecture.

The small sheltered harbor of Honfleur is a timewarp into the past of France’s seafaring history. Very narrow yet tall buildings of the town square were built in a time when France charged property taxes based on the footprint of your home. So instead of building out, local residents built up.

From Wikipedia:

Honfleur is a commune in the Calvados department in northwestern France. It is located on the southern bank of the estuary of the Seine across from le Havre and very close to the exit of the Pont de Normandie. Its inhabitants are called Honfleurais.
It is especially known for its old, beautiful picturesque port, characterized by its houses with slate-covered frontages, painted many times by artists, including in particular Gustave Courbet, Eugène Boudin, Claude Monet and Johan Jongkind, forming the école de Honfleur (Honfleur school) which contributed to the appearance of the Impressionist movement. The Sainte-Catherine church, which has a bell tower separate from the principal building, is the largest church made out of wood in France.

South Island Sunset

WestCoastSunset copy

New Zealand is is a country of vast open spaces and is largely un-populated. The country’s  makeup is small towns strung together by twisting mountain roads and one lane bridges. The rugged west coast of the South Island is predominately undeveloped with a single 2 lane road clinging for life to the mountainside cliffs. This image is looking west from the volcanic shores of the south island. Extraordinary to be sure…but an everyday sight for the locals.

From Wikipedia: New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses ‒ that of the North and South Islands ‒ and numerous smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island nations of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long isolation, New Zealand developed a distinctive biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life; most notable are the large number of unique bird species. The country’s varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions.

If you are interested in exploring the possibility of ordering a print, please contact me for details.

Notes: These are low resolution images and I apologize for the watermark signature on my photographs as I feel it detracts from enjoying the image. However, with the ease of image piracy on-line they are necessary evils. You may also want to read my color post as images can be very different from what you see on the monitor.

Il Grande Canal

The Grande Canal

Venice is not a city that can be described but must be experienced. Boats crowd main canals as tight as cars on highways. Police boats, fire boats, ambulance boats, even delivery “truck” boats replace their 4 wheeled counterparts while the back “alleys” or smaller canals are littered with gondoliers or residents boats moored in the narrow waterways.

In the fall, Venice floods daily with the tides and the city doesn’t skip a beat. Elevated walkways are set out for the tourists to clamber onto while the citizens just pull on their galoshes and continue with their day as if nothing is happening.

Venice is a city of twisty narrow corridors and tiny shops. While the main squares and corridors have a bit of a tourist trap feel to them, the back alleys, tiny restaurants, and shops have an oddly safe feel to them and an authenticity that is pure Italy.

Excerpts From Wikipedia:  Venice (Italian: Venezia) is a city in northeast Italy sited on a group of 118 small islands separated by canals and linked by bridges. It is located in the marshy Venetian Lagoon which stretches along the shoreline between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Venice is renowned for the beauty of its setting, its architecture and its artworks. The city in its entirety is listed as a World Heritage Site, along with its lagoon.

The name is derived from the ancient Veneti people who inhabited the region by the 10th century BC.  The city historically was the capital of the Venetian Republic. Venice has been known as the “La Dominante”, “Serenissima”, “Queen of the Adriatic”, “City of Water”, “City of Masks”, “City of Bridges”, “The Floating City”, and “City of Canals”. Luigi Barzini described it in The New York Times as “undoubtedly the most beautiful city built by man”. Venice has also been described by the Times Online as being one of Europe’s most romantic cities.

The Republic of Venice was a major maritime power during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and a staging area for the Crusades and the Battle of Lepanto, as well as a very important center of commerce (especially silk, grain, and spice) and art in the 13th century up to the end of the 17th century. This made Venice a wealthy city throughout most of its history. It is also known for its several important artistic movements, especially the Renaissance period. Venice has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and it is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi.

Barca e Porta

(Boat and Doorway) 

The magical city of Venice is like nowhere I have been before or since. The doorway featured in this shot demonstrates the quiet canals, vibrant color, and old world charm that typify a walk through the back streets of this storybook city.

If you are interested in exploring the possibility of ordering a print, please contact me for details. All photographs are limited to 500 reproductions. If you are interested in exploring the possibility of ordering a print, please contact me for details. All photographs are limited to 500 reproductions. Notes: These are low resolution images and I apologize for the watermark signature on my photographs as I feel it detracts from enjoying the image. However, with the ease of image piracy on-line they are necessary evils. You may also want to read my color post as images can be very different from what you see on the monitor.

Manarola del Mare

(Manarola by the Sea)

The small town of Manarola is in the province of La Spezia, Liguria, northern Italy. It is the second smallest of the famous Cinque Terre towns frequented by tourists and a picturesque subject that oozes northern coastal Italy. The coastline, the five villages, and the surrounding hillsides are all part of the Cinque Terre National Park and is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.  Over centuries, people have carefully built terraces on the rugged, steep landscape right up to the cliffs that overlook the sea. Part of its charm is the lack of visible “modern” development. Paths, trains and boats connect the villages.

If you are interested in exploring the possibility of ordering a print, please contact me for details. All photographs are limited to 500 reproductions.

Notes: These are low resolution images and I apologize for the watermark signature on my photographs as I feel it detracts from enjoying the image. However, with the ease of image piracy on-line they are necessary evils. You may also want to read my color post as images can be very different from what you see on the monitor. 

Bandon Coast

On the southern Oregon coast is the small town of Bandon, a picturesque Pacific Northwest coastal town nestled against the cliffs.  Probably best known for Bandon Dunes; widely regarded as one of the best golf courses in America.  Bandon is blessed with rugged coastlines and picturesque sea stacks. The spring blesses the coastal hillsides with brilliant yellow wildflowers making the coast a surreal and beautiful photographic setting.

If you are interested in exploring the possibility of ordering a print, please contact me for details. All photographs are limited to 500 reproductions.

Notes: These are low resolution images and I apologize for the watermark signature on my photographs as I feel it detracts from enjoying the image. However, with the ease of image piracy on-line they are necessary evils. You may also want to read my color post as images can be very different from what you see on the monitor.